Tag Archive | Tozer

The Knowledge of the Holy: The Love of God

Knowledge of the Holy

[Editor’s Note: This is a 23-Day Series exploring different aspects of God’s nature and personality, using Tozer’s “The Knowledge of the Holy” as a discussion starter. You can read the introduction of the series here.]

Stop for a second and think about the attributes of God we have discussed so far: one-ness, self-existence, self-sufficiency, eternity, infiniteness, mercy, grace, etc. While all these attributes are awe inspiring, without love, they can at worst be terrifying and at best leave you tepid. Who wouldn’t be fearful of a God who is everywhere, eternal, unlimited, and all-knowing if he was a loveless being? And even if you have such a being who is merciful and full of grace, but doesn’t love you, you’re left with a cold relationship based on your loveless god’s pity. Love is the part of God’s nature that sets Him apart and makes Him desirable.

We have to be careful though. Many, as Tozer has pointed out, have taken John’s statement “God is love,” and have turned that phrase to mean “love is God.” The result has been anything that seems loving, some have turned and worshipped as God.  But generic love is not God, but God is full of sincere and fervent love. While “love” has been used to describe just about anything humans do, God’s love acts as God does. Everything He does is done with love.

This love that we experience from God manifests in many ways.  Love wills the good of another, so when true love from God rests on our heart, we are able to live without fear because “love casts out fear,” (1 John 4:8). When our knowledge of God’s love and His sovereignty are perfected, we are able to live fearless lives confident that His love will mean our good. God’s love also reminds us that He desires friendship. The fact that God has set His love on us means more than just He is a good person. It means He desires relationship. With you. There are staggering implications to this. Finally, love means that the person who loves takes pleasure in the person He has set his affections on. God is fully pleased with you. There is no more need to try and please. You are as loved as you are ever going to be.

Finally, Tozer reminds us that love never lies dormant. It’s always moving. It’s always extending itself to the one it loves. And this is true of God. Jesus told us “Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends,” (John 15:13). And in the cross and since the cross, no one has laid down their life for us more than Jesus.  He sacrificed Himself for us, He is always praying for us, and leading us in laying our lives down.

One of the things that makes the topic of love so important is that Christianity is really the only “religion” that is based upon a relationship of love with it’s God. Talk to any Muslim that you know and they don’t really have an understanding of a God who loves them. Many of the other religions have many gods or no god who very seldom enter into relationship. It’s only in Christianity that God has the heart of a Father toward His children. Human beings were made with a need for love. Our need for love was ultimately designed to be fulfilled by God. We remain empty until we receive it.

And this is why it is so critical that we understand God as a God of love. Christianity lived out of a place of encountering God’s love is electric. It changes a person. But Christianity lived outside of experiencing God’s love is like a clanging symbol. It means nothing to the world and frankly it’s irritating. It’s a code of ethics with no cause that changes no one. But when we are touched in our hearts with the warmth of God’s love, it melts our cold hearts and makes us alive on the inside.

When we experience this love, it changes us. Fire begets fire on this walk that we are on and we begin to live out the same principles of love that God has shown us. We will the go want good things for others, we extend friendship to them, we give of ourselves. The worlds finally gets to see people alive from the inside, living out the message of the cross. The result will be stunning. It’s what the world is waiting for.

That’s my takeaway today. What’s yours? Leave a comment so we can all grow together!

Day 1: Why We Must Think Rightly About God

Day 2: God Incomprehensible

Day 3: A Divine Attribute: Something True About God

Day 4: The Holy Trinity

Day 5: The Self Existence of God

Day 6: The Self Sufficiency of God

Day 7: The Eternity of God

Day 8: God’s Infinitude

Day 9: The Immutability of God

Day 10: The Divine Omniscience

Day 11: The Wisdom of God

Day 12: The Omnipotence of God

Day 13: The Divine Transcendence

Day 14: God’s Omnipresence

Day 15: The Faithfulness of God

Day 16: The Goodness of God

Day 17: The Justice of God

Day 18: The Mercy of God

Day 19: The Grace of God

Day 20: The Love of God

Day 21: The Holiness of God

Day 22: The Sovereignty of God

Day 23: The Open Secret

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The Knowledge of the Holy: The Grace of God

Knowledge of the Holy

[Editor’s Note: This is a 23-Day Series exploring different aspects of God’s nature and personality, using Tozer’s “The Knowledge of the Holy” as a discussion starter. You can read the introduction of the series here.]

Grace. It’s a word we use so often we sometimes forget what it means. In the last five years of church history, the word has taken on a whole new dynamic. There are men that are called “hyper-grace” believers and there are others being called legalists for not emphasizing grace enough. And if we’re not careful we can talk much about a word we barely understand, all the while thinking we totally understand part of God’s nature.  Because grace is something that God is, our understanding of it is essential in this hour.

Hang with me here. Because I know that on Friday we talked about God’s mercy. And while Tozer (and I) will acknowledge that in God these two attributes are one, they are experienced in our humanity in slightly different ways. Mercy is God in his goodness confronting our guilt. But grace is God bestowing benefits upon undeserving people.

Picture the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32). He has squandered his father’s inheritance and has realized what a terrible wrong he has done. He then returns home to a father, unsure of his father’s reaction and willing to be a slave just to survive. When he returns home, a watching father runs to his son while he’s still a long ways off and embraces him. The son repents. Now we know the father forgives this son. This was mercy. But when the father sends for the robe, the ring, sandals, and the feast, this is grace. Grace is what causes God to take us from the ash heap and seat us with princes (1 Samuel 2:8).

As I’ve pointed out before, Tozer likes to remind us of the foundation he has already laid in previous chapters. Because God is eternal and immutable, it’s not as if God suddenly developed grace as a part of His nature in response to our need. Instead, God has had grace in His nature since before the foundation of the world. Men in the Old Testament received grace. The sacrifice of Jesus has always been pointed to as the channel of this grace. And men and women since the New Testament have been recipients of grace.  All of this comes through Jesus, who was looked forward to in the Old Testament and who has been looked backward on since His death and resurrection.

We do well to remember, as well, since grace is part of God’s nature, it is also infinite. There is no end to God’s grace. Tozer compares God’s grace to our need. Picture mankind’s great sin. If all of them were to be numbered, it would seem innumerable. And yet, Scripture makes it clear, where sin abounds, God’s grace abounds much, much more (Romans 5:20).

One of the things that I love about grace that we forget is that we don’t deserve it. Usually we don’t forget this when we are asking God for grace for ourselves. We usually remember this very easily. But we do forget this when we are dealing with others. Grace is God giving us what we don’t deserve. GRACE (as some have very nicely described it) is God’s Riches At Christ’s Expense. We get access to this by the free gift of Jesus’ life and death and resurrection. And so when we’re dealing with others, as those who have tasted God’s grace, we should be gracious, giving beyond what people deserve. This is the question we need to ask ourselves: Has my life been a picture of God’s grace to others?

At the same time, we should understand that grace is not given as a license for sin. Yes, we can sin and be recipients of grace. Sinning happens. But true recipients of grace are not content to take advantage of grace. Because grace is access to God’s riches and power to overcome sin is part of God’s riches, we should be quick to use grace to overcome sin. Paul, who was accused of being hyper-grace in his day, said “Should we go on sinning so that grace may increase? No!” (Romans 6:1-2). Grace, in the economy of God, for a person who is constantly late is a watch that they could not afford. Grace empowers, it doesn’t entitle.

And so my encouragement today is for you and I to become hungry to receive and know God’s grace more than we already do. Let’s enjoy the ring and the feast that our Father has brought to us.  Let’s show that grace to others who still think their father only wants slaves. But lets also use the grace given us as more than just an excuse for sin. Let’s use it to overcome those things that have held us back. Let’s truly experience real grace and show it to others. .

That’s my takeaway today. What’s yours? Leave a comment so we can all grow together!

Day 1: Why We Must Think Rightly About God

Day 2: God Incomprehensible

Day 3: A Divine Attribute: Something True About God

Day 4: The Holy Trinity

Day 5: The Self Existence of God

Day 6: The Self Sufficiency of God

Day 7: The Eternity of God

Day 8: God’s Infinitude

Day 9: The Immutability of God

Day 10: The Divine Omniscience

Day 11: The Wisdom of God

Day 12: The Omnipotence of God

Day 13: The Divine Transcendence

Day 14: God’s Omnipresence

Day 15: The Faithfulness of God

Day 16: The Goodness of God

Day 17: The Justice of God

Day 18: The Mercy of God

Day 19: The Grace of God

Day 20: The Love of God

Day 21: The Holiness of God

Day 22: The Sovereignty of God

Day 23: The Open Secret

The Knowledge of the Holy: The Mercy of God

Knowledge of the Holy

[Editor’s Note: This is a 23-Day Series exploring different aspects of God’s nature and personality, using Tozer’s “The Knowledge of the Holy” as a discussion starter. You can read the introduction of the series here.]

Yesterday’s post ended talking about this crazy paradox that believers in Jesus are called to navigate: We serve a just God who shows justice and at the same time is completely full of mercy.  This idea is so hard for us that Christians for centuries have tried to understand how God’s justice and His mercy mingle together. But make no mistake, the fact that we are not immediately consumed when we sin, the fact that there are more chances to repent and change, and the fact that Jesus died to save us from sin all point to a God unfathomably rich in mercy.  Our job is to respond to that mercy appropriately.

Tozer tells us early that the mercy God has is a deep motivation from inside the Godhead to show compassion to those who do not deserve it. He spends time talking about how only mercy can take a man or woman who was once God’s enemy and show that man or woman goodness.  We should live in the wonder of God’s mercy.

But because of our human nature we spend a large amount of time confused about God’s mercy. We sometimes feel like the God of Israel (or the Old Testament) was a the just judge whose judgment is only held back by the mercy of Jesus as demonstrated and taught in the New Testament. But Tozer reminds us of the ground we have already covered. God is one and not conflicted. He is eternal and not prone to divine mood swings. Mercy emanates from Him because He is eternally merciful, not because He had a change of heart.

The challenge for us, then, is to live as if mercy from God is real and constant. We cannot believe in mercy but exist as if it’s some kind of heavenly lotto we hope to win one day. We have to begin to live lives that reflect having tasted God’s mercy. This is harder than it sounds. It starts with believing that God is truly merciful. We have to renew our minds with the idea that mercy isn’t God’s temporary disposition. It’s who He is. As we renew our minds, we begin to walk in the experience of God’s mercy. The sins and regrets of the past slowly have less and less power over us.

This is the area where I need to grow significantly in. Over and over I’m struck by Tozer’s description of God as someone who isn’t merciful on a whim. My mercy is short-lived, but God’s mercy is constant and we can grow in our ability to live in freedom by believing God’s mercy is ever toward us.

Can we, by faith, walk in a greater experience of God’s mercy? I believe so. Let’s not (as Tozer says) “starve outside the banquet hall.” This was never God’s heart for His children. He desires that we know Him as the God of all mercy and comfort. Pray for me today, that I would know God’s mercy as a truth of who He is and not a divine mood swing.

That’s my takeaway today. What’s yours? Leave a comment so we can all grow together!

Day 1: Why We Must Think Rightly About God

Day 2: God Incomprehensible

Day 3: A Divine Attribute: Something True About God

Day 4: The Holy Trinity

Day 5: The Self Existence of God

Day 6: The Self Sufficiency of God

Day 7: The Eternity of God

Day 8: God’s Infinitude

Day 9: The Immutability of God

Day 10: The Divine Omniscience

Day 11: The Wisdom of God

Day 12: The Omnipotence of God

Day 13: The Divine Transcendence

Day 14: God’s Omnipresence

Day 15: The Faithfulness of God

Day 16: The Goodness of God

Day 17: The Justice of God

Day 18: The Mercy of God

Day 19: The Grace of God

Day 20: The Love of God

Day 21: The Holiness of God

Day 22: The Sovereignty of God

Day 23: The Open Secret

The Knowledge of the Holy: The Justice of God

Knowledge of the Holy

[Editor’s Note: This is a 23-Day Series exploring different aspects of God’s nature and personality, using Tozer’s “The Knowledge of the Holy” as a discussion starter. You can read the introduction of the series here.]

We all want a God who gives us our fair share and protects us from who would wrong us. We also deeply want a God who forgives us for the evil that we participate in. And if we have a bad view of God, one who is injust, we will either be terrified of God because of the wrong we have done or we will attempt to take advantage of Him for the forgiving God that He is. Either way, at the end of the day, only by understanding God as a God of justice will we relate to God as He truly is.

To understand God’s justice, we first have to understand that righteousness and justice are the same thing. God is just because He is righteous in all He does. Psalmists and prophets of the Old Testament called out to God to judge the world and when they did they made an appeal to God to make the whole world right again.  Justice, as Tozer tells us, contains the idea of moral equity. God’s judgments (and therefore His justice) are His way of setting the world right.

Tozer is also faithful to point out where we have elevated someone or something above God. He takes aim at the places where we have constrained God and said “he must do such and such because it’s just.” And it’s in this place where we have made justice something God is bound to. God is not bound to justice. Justice is bound up in God. Justice is the way God does things. Its part of His nature that we have learned and applied to things, but nothing is just if it isn’t found in God. God acts the way He acts, and we on the outside view that and call it justice.

All of this talk of justice, of God acting just all the time, could be used to persuade us that God is only just and never merciful. It can produce a kind of fear of God that would dread Him but never run to Him, that is to say, an unbiblical kind of fear of God. But God’s justice is never at odds with His mercy. To quote Tozer “goodness without justice is not goodness.” And whenever God acts justly, He is also acting with mercy. No more clearly is this seen than in the cross of Jesus. Justice was done and mercy was given, but neither justice nor mercy was diminished. Both attributes of God’s nature are in full force simultaneously manifested without the least bit of contradiction. And the result was the justification of you and I.

And this is where I feel like the real meat of our discussion is today. God is just and He makes just decisions. So many today say things like “only God can judge me” or “judge not, lest you be judged,” and in the ultimate sense these statements are true. But they tare an attempt to escape God’s judgment and treat Him as if He is not just. They treat Him as if He does not see sin or as if the sin doesn’t matter to Him. But sin matters deeply to God. It cost Him you. It cost Him His son. It’s not a light thing. So we must tremble before God. We must believe that He really takes this issue called iniquity very seriously.

And yet simultaneously, we cannot run away from God because we have sin. The justice of God is most fully displayed in the death of His son. He crushed sin in His Son to draw us closer to Him. How awful would it be to know remorse for your sin but to hate it so much you never received its cure?! In Jesus we have both Judge and Attorney. He helps us and vindicates us. And our victory over sin is never accomplished until we run to the judge who will stand in our place for us.

So acknowledge today both the places where you have treated sin lightly and where you haven’t run to Your judge with Your sin. If you deal with both issues, You will find a just God who gives mercy. And in that place, we find freedom.

That’s my takeaway today. What’s yours? Leave a comment so we can all grow together!

Day 1: Why We Must Think Rightly About God

Day 2: God Incomprehensible

Day 3: A Divine Attribute: Something True About God

Day 4: The Holy Trinity

Day 5: The Self Existence of God

Day 6: The Self Sufficiency of God

Day 7: The Eternity of God

Day 8: God’s Infinitude

Day 9: The Immutability of God

Day 10: The Divine Omniscience

Day 11: The Wisdom of God

Day 12: The Omnipotence of God

Day 13: The Divine Transcendence

Day 14: God’s Omnipresence

Day 15: The Faithfulness of God

Day 16: The Goodness of God

Day 17: The Justice of God

Day 18: The Mercy of God

Day 19: The Grace of God

Day 20: The Love of God

Day 21: The Holiness of God

Day 22: The Sovereignty of God

Day 23: The Open Secret

The Knowledge of the Holy: The Goodness of God

Knowledge of the Holy

[Editor’s Note: This is a 23-Day Series exploring different aspects of God’s nature and personality, using Tozer’s “The Knowledge of the Holy” as a discussion starter. You can read the introduction of the series here.]

Sometimes the attributes we are studying in this journey seem so simple and so uncontested that we have a hard time thinking God was any other way. And yet, when we get past the immediate statement “God is _______,” we find there are a hundred different scenarios where our belief in these attributes is tested and we find ourselves acting as if that quality wasn’t true. The attribute of God’s goodness fits nicely in that category. All of us like to believe God is good. Very few have probably trusted in God’s goodness in a way that satisfies their heart in the hour of testing.  And that is the journey in front of us as we look at God’s goodness.

In fact, goodness is such a common word, so easily spoken and believed, that Tozer begins the chapter defining “goodnesss.” What is it? What do we mean when we say it about God? Many think it means God is right or holy or pure. But when we talk about God’s goodness, we are actually talking about His capacity to do good to mankind.  He is full of good will towards the most sinful of us and this reality should stagger us and change how we live.

There are tremendous implications of a God dedicated to doing good to mankind. All of our relationship to God and our hope in securing His favor is based on the fact that God is good. Something about God caused Him to want to do good toward us rebels.  And because of this fact, we are able to enter into a relationship with this good God through the sacrifice of His Son and access an innumerable amount of prosmises. Because God’s goodness is part of His nature, it is “self-caused, infinite, perfect, and eternal.” God’s reason for being good has nothing to do with us or our merit. He does it because He wants to be good to us.

This is why we can trust that when we come to God, He will not despise us or act unfavorably toward us. Quoting Meister Eckhart, Tozer reminds us that a man who repents of a life full of more sin than all the sin of every age could come to Jesus in repentance and find God as being good towards him. In our day, we can say that Hitler, the most vile abortion doctor, the greediest Wall Street Banker, and the man who traffics women and young boys could all find mercy from this good God, if they come to Him in repentance.

Tozer’s response to the sinner who comes to Christ wondering how God will treat him is to point the sinner to Christ. In Christ we see how God acts in every circumstance. To the hypocrite and the poser, Jesus may remain distant. But to the broken, the poor in spirit, the self-hater, and the destitute, they will all find Jesus welcoming them into the goodness of God.  Tozer closes reminding us that our relationship with God is a paradox: because God is great, we tremble in holy fear, but because God is good, we draw close, knowing God will be good to us.

I thoroughly enjoyed today’s chapter, because this is one of those chapters that gets to the heart of the gospel and our own hearts. Jesus calls us to be good to everyone because our Father is good to everyone, even His enemies (Matthew 5:44-45). But so often I find myself running out of goodness to give to others. So often I find myself being overcome by the poor response of others. But God has called us to not base our responses to them on how they respond to us, but on how God responds to us. And because God is an infinite source of goodness, we should have a never ending source to pull from.

For that reason, I want to call you, dear brothers and sisters, to taste the Lord’s goodness (Psalms 34:8). When we taste the refreshing goodness of the Lord, it’s easier to be good to those around us. When we aren’t encountering the Lord’s goodness, it’s easy for us to become bitter and disappointed with the actions of others. Instead, we remind ourselves of the Lord’s goodness. We remember that we didn’t deserve goodness, but Christ showed it to us anyways. As we do, we become thankful and see more of the Lord’s good hand in our lives.  We begin to acknowledge what has already been good and we see more of it as well.  The goodness that flows from God to us as we renew our minds in this way will naturally flow to others.

But friends, we cannot sit back and resist the Lord’s goodness. We have to become hearty souls hungry for the Lord’s goodness.To the degree that we don’t, we will become like the older brother in the story of the prodigal son, always trying to do well and living at the Father’s house, but at the end of the day very distant from our Father’s heart.  Let’s fear that reality and know that by simply being willing to receive God’s goodness, we can have the Father’s heart and be filled with joy.

That’s my takeaway today. What’s yours? Leave a comment so we can all grow together!

Day 1: Why We Must Think Rightly About God

Day 2: God Incomprehensible

Day 3: A Divine Attribute: Something True About God

Day 4: The Holy Trinity

Day 5: The Self Existence of God

Day 6: The Self Sufficiency of God

Day 7: The Eternity of God

Day 8: God’s Infinitude

Day 9: The Immutability of God

Day 10: The Divine Omniscience

Day 11: The Wisdom of God

Day 12: The Omnipotence of God

Day 13: The Divine Transcendence

Day 14: God’s Omnipresence

Day 15: The Faithfulness of God

Day 16: The Goodness of God

Day 17: The Justice of God

Day 18: The Mercy of God

Day 19: The Grace of God

Day 20: The Love of God

Day 21: The Holiness of God

Day 22: The Sovereignty of God

Day 23: The Open Secrett

The Knowledge of the Holy: The Faithfulness of God

Knowledge of the Holy

[Editor’s Note: This is a 23-Day Series exploring different aspects of God’s nature and personality, using Tozer’s “The Knowledge of the Holy” as a discussion starter. You can read the introduction of the series here.]

Today’s reading was another one of those chapters where it seems like all of God’s attributes came crashing in together. Tozer seems to have spent more of the chapter describing how God’s attributes are all one in His being than he did actually describing God’s faithfulness! But it was warranted and served as a good reminder that God is One, not three or even many parts. He is single in everything He does and understanding that will help us know Him much better than we currently do.

In discussing God’s faithfulness, Tozer reminds us that God is immutable (He doesn’t change). And because God doesn’t change, He will be faithful. If there were ever a time that God wasn’t faithful, He would at that very moment have changed.  And this gets at the heart of how God is so incredibly different than we are. We change and therefore we can be faithful or unfaithful, depending on how we feel. But God doesn’t change and so He always remains faithful.

I loved when Tozer identifies ways in which we perceive God wrongly. Today he highlighted the idea we have where God is torn between two different aspects of His character. But God is one and his attributes, like say love and justice, are never at odds within Him. There is no Father/Son arm-wrestling match in Heaven to decide whether justice or mercy will be shown to people on Earth. In God’s justice, He shows mercy. And in God’s mercy, He shows justice.

Tozer then moves to God’s faithfulness. The Bible is full of descriptions of His faithful dealings with His people, from Genesis to Revelation.  But Tozer highlights a profound truth: God’s faithfulness is the grounds for the blessings we hope to inherit one day. Our confidence that we will receive them rests on our ability to trust God’s faithfulness to keep His word. This ability to trust God’s faithfulness, even through hard times, has a biblical name: faith.

We become people of faith by seeing God’s faithfulness played out before us over and over again. We believe something God says and wait for it to come to pass. Then when we see it come to pass, we have an easier time believing it will come to pass again.  There are times when God will give a supernatural measure of faith to help us to believe for things we have never seen before, but most faith grows by watching God do what He says. This is how we gain trust with our parents and others in the natural and it works in a similar way with God.

Understanding God’s faithfulness and becoming a person of faith is crucial to our lives. Only people who know and understand that God is with them and will not abandon them can face the future with courage. Many face life not knowing whether they will succeed or whether death and gloom awaits around every corner. But if you’ve found Jesus faithful, you can even look death square in the face with assurance of victory. You know Your God will not abandon you.

My encouragement for all of us today is to begin to take God at His word. In our lives, you and I have places where we feel like there has been some kind of disappointment with God. That doesn’t mean God has failed, but it’s entirely possible we had incorrect expectations. My encouragement for you today is to find the places where your faith in God has grown weak because You haven’t seen God’s faithfulness and begin to ask Jesus to renew faith in your heart. He will prove Himself faithful. He can do no other.

That’s my takeaway today. What’s yours? Leave a comment so we can all grow together!

That’s my takeaway today. What’s yours? Leave a comment so we can all grow together!

Day 1: Why We Must Think Rightly About God

Day 2: God Incomprehensible

Day 3: A Divine Attribute: Something True About God

Day 4: The Holy Trinity

Day 5: The Self Existence of God

Day 6: The Self Sufficiency of God

Day 7: The Eternity of God

Day 8: God’s Infinitude

Day 9: The Immutability of God

Day 10: The Divine Omniscience

Day 11: The Wisdom of God

Day 12: The Omnipotence of God

Day 13: The Divine Transcendence

Day 14: God’s Omnipresence

Day 15: The Faithfulness of God

Day 16: The Goodness of God

Day 17: The Justice of God

Day 18: The Mercy of God

Day 19: The Grace of God

Day 20: The Love of God

Day 21: The Holiness of God

Day 22: The Sovereignty of God

Day 23: The Open Secret

The Knowledge of the Holy: God’s Omnipresence

Knowledge of the Holy

[Editor’s Note: This is a 23-Day Series exploring different aspects of God’s nature and personality, using Tozer’s “The Knowledge of the Holy” as a discussion starter. You can read the introduction of the series here.]

Air is everywhere. Air is something we take for granted. But if we were to remove all the air from the room that we are in we would definitely appreciate it more. And when we think about God and His ability to be present everywhere, we relate to Him in the same way. We take for granted His presence but would certainly notice His absence. But awakening to His constant presence is the sweet spot of Christianity that we all strive for. And this is what Tozer encourages us to do.

He first explains omnipresence. Presence is being close to or next to someone or something. Adding the “Omni” to the front means God is next to or close to everyone at all times. Tozer makes the argument God’s omnipresence is assumed and expounded upon throughout the Bible. God is all around us, what water is to fish and air is to birds.

Tozer presents God’s presence in the world as the answer to many of our questions.  The secular world is constantly asking whether the world is only physical or a mixture of physical and spiritual realities. God’s presence throughout the world answers these questions with a strong yes. God loves creation. It is both physical and spiritual.  God’s presence also means that He is always with us. No believer has to wonder whether God has left. Our awareness of His presence will continually change, but His actual presence never changes. He is always with us. This truth sustains our heart in confusing and turbulent times.

Tozer summarizes all this by telling his readers that we should be comforted by God’s omnipresence, but that we should attempt to live life aware of His presence. For all the comfort of the truth God is near us, it changes believers to be aware of God in their daily lives.

What I love about today’s reading was the assumption that God is there. Obviously that’s true, but we operate so many times without it, even though theologically we know it’s true. We feel abandoned by God. We feel like some how if God was there, He would have saved us from sorrow. But God is always near.

In the house church world that I live in, there is a wing of the house church movement in the United States that base their meetings on a concept called God’s prevenience. Prevenience means that God has already been doing something in a certain place or situation before You got there. (You can read more about the “prevenience model” of church here.) God has always been in a place before you got there. Your job is to point Him out. His omnipresence has existed, He’s actually even been doing things there, but as a believer your job is to bring others’ attentions to this fact.

We do this by first learning the truth: God is everywhere. And then we begin to take moments of time, acknowledge the truth in our hearts, and look for signs of God’s being with us in whatever place we are in. As we look, God begins to show us signs of His presence. We begin to realize we are not alone. Sometimes we even begin to realize that the place we are standing in is holy ground (Exodus 3:5). As we sense and become aware of God’s nearness, we begin to get better at making others aware. We can speak into situations showing the world God’s activity. What started as a simple doctrine becomes a means for God breaking in to the lives of our friends.

All of this starts, though, with this simple truth: there is nowhere God isn’t. If you feel like He isn’t with you, we may need to work on your feelings, but He is there. He is not absent. He is always with you.  He will show Himself faithful again and again by proving He is with you, even in the darkest of nights.  This truth, properly placed in the believers life, will act as a rudder during the storms of life, making them strong in hours that would have overwhelmed anyone else.

That’s my takeaway today. What’s yours? Leave a comment so we can all grow together!

Day 1: Why We Must Think Rightly About God

Day 2: God Incomprehensible

Day 3: A Divine Attribute: Something True About God

Day 4: The Holy Trinity

Day 5: The Self Existence of God

Day 6: The Self Sufficiency of God

Day 7: The Eternity of God

Day 8: God’s Infinitude

Day 9: The Immutability of God

Day 10: The Divine Omniscience

Day 11: The Wisdom of God

Day 12: The Omnipotence of God

Day 13: The Divine Transcendence

Day 14: God’s Omnipresence

Day 15: The Faithfulness of God

Day 16: The Goodness of God

Day 17: The Justice of God

Day 18: The Mercy of God

Day 19: The Grace of God

Day 20: The Love of God

Day 21: The Holiness of God

Day 22: The Sovereignty of God

Day 23: The Open Secret