Tag Archive | Thoughts

Primal by Mark Batterson

[This blog is part of a blog tour for Primal by Mark Batterson.*]

I stumbled onto the Batterson Blog a few months ago thanks to the recommendation of Randy Bohlender of Stuff I Think fame.  As I’ve read the posts I’ve come to enjoy Mark Batterson’s unique perspective on life and ministry which is both transparent and biblical all at the same time.  In true Web 2.0 form I became aware of Mark’s new book through his blog and I was intrigued because the theme of Mark’s book, restoring the lost soul of Christianity, and signed up to join the blog tour. 

Mark’s book reads like an extended version of his blog, which in my opinion is a compliment.  It’s personal, a good mix of experience and biblical thought, and well-written.  Mark contends that we must return to what made Christianity great in the first few centuries and in order to do that, we must return to what made our Christianity great in the first days after we came to know Christ.  This is the primal place, the place, according to Mark, “where loving God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength is all that matters…[where] the place for the lost soul of Christianity begins…”

I have to stop here and say that while I believe that loving God with all of our being is essential to restoring the lost soul of Christianity, I do not believe that you can just start there.  I believe that loving God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength is the result of a revelation of Jesus to the human heart, both initially and continually over the life of a believer.

The way forward in each of these areas (heart, soul, mind, and strength) seems somewhat like a maintenance prescription for a car that neglects filling the tank with gasoline. And while I’m sure that Mark believes in the necessity of encountering Jesus regularly, the book seems to convey the idea that simply attempting to grow in love in these four areas will cause Christianity to be revitalized. So, yes, these are essential, but they have to flow out of a revelation of God to the human heart.  And when they do, we will see the recovery Mark is talking about.

That said, if you are encountering Jesus in a continual and regular basis and are looking to be pushed in some practical ways, this a good book and will be helpful for you.  Mark splits it up into four sections focusing in on how we can grow in our heart, soul, mind, and spirit.  I’ve never seen someone take quite the same amount of time on each of these sections individually.  Each one would be great to focus on devotionally for a season of time and I think the book can be read that way. For the purpose of brevity, lets look at each of these sections and sum up Mark’s take on them.

Heart

The first section of the book is about loving with our heart and Mark does a good job of showing us how we’ve stopped living (and loving) from our hearts.  He then points to the fact that much of our Christianity is detached from feeling what God feels and he calls the reader back to the place of feeling the things that God feels very deeply. 

Mark’s description of what happens when we touch God’s heart focuses primarily on how it affects our pocket book.  People who feel what God feels are compelled to lives of extravagant giving and generosity toward the lost and the poor.  I whole-heartedly agree.  My only complaint is we don’t see much on how loving with our whole heart affects other areas of our lives, such as prayer, how we spend our time, or live out our testimony before unbelievers.

Soul

The next section focuses on loving God with our soul.  This was probably the section that challenged me the most.  Mark links the growth of our soul in love to our ability to wonder at things around us.  God, he says, wondered at His creation and we stunt our spiritual growth into His image if we loose our capacity to wonder at the things around us.  I know for me, it’s easy to get caught in routine and lose a wonder for God and the things He has created. 

The primary place of wonder Mark spends time calling us to rediscover is our wonder over the record of God found in the Bible. I found myself whole-heartedly agreeing with him about our tendency to expect to be fed by a local church leader and not feeding ourselves on the truth in the Bible.  Mark shines in this section as both a teacher and a confronter.

Mind

After looking at our ability to love God with our soul, Mark spends time exploring what it means to love God with our mind. One thing I’ve learned by reading Mark’s blog and the book is that Mark has never been fond of boundaries and it shines through in this chapter.   Because of that, Mark believes that there are new, God-inspired thoughts that can change the world and change lives, and it’s the believer’s duty to tap into them. 

The challenge then is to receive these thoughts and act on them. The only way to put these thoughts into action is to change our approach to risk and failure, because a fear of failure will cause us only to replicate already existing patterns.  Again this was solid food for thought and prayer and I would recommend it to those who haven’t thought about what it means to love God with their mind.

Strength

I have to be honest, I haven’t read this section yet, which saddens me.  But the blog tour must take place and I can’t leave a book unfinished, so at some point stop back and I’ll give you my thoughts.  I do have to say, however, that I think this is shaping up to be the strongest part of the book.  Just by way of looking at the chapter titles, this is the part of the book I was most excited about and I believe most tangibly relates to movements.  I’ll be interested also to see how Mark ties all four sections together into the “Primal Movement” he’s been describing since the beginning of the book.

In summary, Mark offers us a good book on returning to an all-encompassing relationship with Jesus.  Because (at least in my estimation) Mark seems to be a boundary pusher, anyone who needs a jolt in their walk with Jesus or just a different perspective on loving God would benefit from the book.  Again, I believe it would have been helpful to explore more of the vertical aspects of this love that Mark calls us to pursue.  Things like encountering Jesus in prayer, fasting, and meditation might have been helpful.  But to the person who is, this book will definitely push your boundaries in each of these four areas and bring us closer to the primal movement we all long to see.

*In the interest of full disclosure, Multinomah offered a free copy of this book in exchange for a review posted here as well as on a merchant site.

Have You Been a Part of One of These?

It is the nature of movements to have leaders that inspire those around them to fulfill a cause.  It is also the nature of movements to be made up of people who, once inspired by the leader, give that leader the assurance that fulfilling the cause is possible after all.

Deep Thought While Watching Star Trek

My wife and I went and watched the latest Star Trek movie last night, not because we’re “Trekkies” but because we thought J. J. Abrams would do an amazing job.  The movie was good and J. J. Abrams did not disappoint.

But while I was sitting there I had a thought that I think would be helpful to share.  It’s hard to deny the impact that Star Trek has had on us as a society.  If you scour the internet there will be no end of articles about how the technology we “saw” in Star Trek has become what we use.  This article has a great summary of some surprising ways Star Trek changed what we do.  

But what struck me was how much the ideology of Star Trek has become part of our society, even more than the technology.  We shouldn’t forget that the point of Gene Rodenberry‘s show was to show humanity working together beyond their boundaries to better mankind.  This is why Star Trek was the first T.V. show to have an interracial kiss and why all the members of the Enterprise are from distinctly different nationalities.  Rodenberry also intentionally created a world where human beings had stopped believing in anything beyond science.  His depicition, no matter how comical at times, has very subtley shaped society.

So here’s my deep thought: This man created a vision of the future and sold it to the Earth in such a way that we have begun to build towards it.  How should our vision of the end of the Age and the Kingdom of God change the way we live in society now?  How shoud it cause us to live our lives differently?

Let The Record Show…

Maybe this never happens to you, but sometimes while I’m reading my Bible my mind drifts and I begin to think about something besides what I’m reading.

Some times I can’t get the last episode of some TV show out of my head.  Sometimes it’s something going on at work.  Tonight it was a question I had for the Lord.  I needed an answer and it was bothering me that I didn’t have one.

So I’m kind of half-reading and praying at the same time, asking God to reveal to me the answer to the question I’m needing an answer to.  Then, I look at the next paragraph in my Bible, and there in the words of the text is the exact answer to the question I was asking the Lord just seconds earlier.

You know how Paul says, “All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work,” (2 Timothy 3:16-17)?

Yeah…he wasn’t kidding.

The Handyman Club of America

So tonight I was opening my mail while I was sitting in my living room with my wife and a friend.  This is not a typical practice for me, but a particular letter caught my eye.  It was a direct mail piece sent to me specificly from the Handyman Club of America.  Now, subsequent internet searches have told me this really isn’t worth my time, but I was curious so I read a few paragraphs out loud.  It seemed pretty legit until I ready the following:

“It’s my pleasure to inform you that YOU HAVE BEEN NOMINATED TO BECOME AN OFFICIAL MEMBER OF THE CLUB…Why you?  Well it’s no secret among your friends and family that you are an oustanding handyman.”

Now my questions is this: Should I be more offended that this was a lie (no one really nominated me) or that those in the living room with me laughed in a significant way when I read this statement out loud?  You be the judge.

Dr. Seuss On The Brain

Which is worse: Being able to almost fully recite the text of Dr. Seuss’ ABC’s or having your daughter correct you when you can’t quite get the words right?

Ah well…it might have something to do with the fact that I’ve covered this story somewhere before.  (And yes, I know, the song doesn’t play.  Maybe that’s a good thing.)

Heard In My House…

This is Part II of my continuing coverage of  “Snow Fury 2008.”  You can catch Part I here.

Christy was in our son’s room and I was near the window.  A loud, gravely noise makes its way past our house.  I look outside expecting to see a snow plow, but instead see a beat up old van…the kind you’d expect to see on my side of town.

Travis: “Wow…you know it’s bad when you expect to see a snow plow moving past the house and instead you see a beat up old mini-van.”

Christy: “That wasn’t a snow plow?”

You heard it here first, folks…