Tag Archive | Jesus Movements

A Quick and Dirty Review of “Giving Up Control” by A.J. Dejonge

What It’s About: A.J. Dejonge tells the autobiographical story of their time as Campus Crusade for Christ (CCC) University missionaries when he and his team made a transition from a staff-led campus ministry to a student-led campus ministry. This allowed CCC staff to start and oversee multiple campus ministries at different colleges. Based on this experience, he argues that student-led (or lay-led) ministries can reach more people than any revival through the means of disciple multiplication. Dejonge contends that only catalytic ministry styles will allow CCC, other college ministries, and even the church itself achieve the multiplication disciples it is called to.

What I Liked: There was so much to like here!

First, Dejonge is clearly interested in starting movements where people need to hear the Gospel of Jesus Christ. This is something people who have fallen in love with Jesus should be pursuing and his passion to reach the lost is contagious. Everything that is found within the pages of this book is focused on getting more people involved in reaching those who haven’t come to love Jesus.

While the book tells the story of their campus ministry expansion, it’s organized around different proverbs that their ministry has discovered. These proverbs help tease out the wisdom of their approach of putting every day students in charge of the ministry of reaching the campus. A few of the proverbs include: “Lead only to train,” “Value transferability over personal genius,” and “The empowered masses will always outperform the professionalism of a few.” Many of these proverbs are designed to help navigate the tricky balance between being a too-heavily centralized ministry or a healthy decentralized movement.

I love how the principles found in this book don’t just apply to CCC. While everything he learned during his time is taught through the lens of a college ministry, many of the concepts of multiplication have been borrowed from experienced church multiplication experts and can be easily implemented in multiplying ministry in the church. Dejonge essentially said part of this process was designed to help his college students start churches if they graduate and move to towns where no churches exist. At the very end of the book he acknowledges he is now in the process of planting a church outside of CCC using the very principles he is writing about.


What I Didn’t Like: There’s really only one chapter of the book I didn’t like. Chapter 10 is called “Ownership and Control” and Dejonge wrestles with the question of who really owns the ministry in this chapter. By the end of the chapter, it’s clear that while Dejonge is clearly in favor of giving much of the ministry happening on each campus to the college students on each campus, at the end of the day it’s still the staff who are ultimately in charge. This seemed odd from a book called “Giving Up Control.” He talks about a nearby college ministry that wanted support, but ultimately did not want to become a CCC affiliate and then goes on to speak about the wisdom of franchises. I think here, he misses the point of humility, being teachable, and healthy response to mentors in favor a business model that is man-centered. He makes some understandable points about why CCC staff is still ultimately in control of each ministry and yet there is a sense in reading this chapter that the name and brand of the ministry may still occupy a little too high of place in the author’s mind.

Should You Get It: Probably! If you’ve never been in ministry or never thought about multiplying disciples and churches, I would likely point you to an easier entry point like “The Master Plan of Evangelism” by Robert Coleman, because it’s more accessible for every Christian. However, if you are in any kind of leadership capacity, if you have a heart for making disciples that make disciples, if you have apostolic leanings, or you’re part of a house church or church plant, I would seriously encourage you to pick up a copy of this book. It has a lot of practical wisdom about instilling skills and competencies in people so that you can entrust the work of the Gospel to them with minimal oversight and this is critical to raising up movements of the Gospel.

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Three Things that Hinder a Movement

I’ve been listening to a phenomenal set of interviews by Steve Addison that are part of his “Movements That Change the World” podcast. Steve is interviewing “Barney,” a missionary and church planter that has helped spark a movement in an undisclosed third world nation.

In his fourth interview, “Barney” is describing the wider context in which movements happen.  Near the end of the interview, Barney talks about three different things that work their way in and distort the DNA of a church multiplication movement.  Most of us would expect these things to be things like heresy or sin.  What’s shocking about the things that he lists is they are things that well-intentioned people want to do for successful ministries.  What does Barney say hinders movements?

  • Buildings- According to Barney, church planting movements happen in all sorts of unconventional places: houses, restaurants, wherever people gather.  When someone comes in and builds a building for the movement, the focus shifts from starting multiple churches in many people’s homes to getting as many people to come to the building as possible.
  • External Funding- When money comes in from outside of the movement, it can cause the movement to embrace activities that in can’t sustain on its own financially.  This can cause the church receiving funding to not be responsible for the resourcing of it’s own activities.  Financial independence is crucial in the life of movements.
  • Non-Practical Training- Probably the most seductive of the three, this typically happens when someone comes in and offers to build a bible college to train workers.  The reality, though, is that this training takes people away from a more hands-on, obedience based training already happening within a movement.

Pretty interesting.  Now, here’s the real question: these realities cause movements to slow in the third world.  Is it possible that they hinder us as well? If so, why haven’t we noticed it before? Share your thoughts in the comment section!

Photo Credit: Social Media Patterns (Energy Minimized / No Overlap) by KentBye

Why Our Giving Doesn’t Result in Movements

[This is part of an ongoing discussion on Financing a Kingdom Revolution.]

Discouraged.  That’s one of the words that consistently describes my attitude toward Kingdom finances.  The reason? I frequently see much of the money given in the name of Jesus used in ways that Jesus didn’t use money.  And at the same time I see a number of legitimate people attempting to follow Jesus but lacking crucial funding that could amplify their substantial work.  Somewhere there’s a disconnect when there are starving children in Africa  America down the street* and we’re concerned because the carpet on the floor of a church building is wearing out.

It’s a startling fact, but some statistics say 97% of money given in churches is spent on people who gave the money. This means that no matter how much we say we desire the lost to be saved, the hungry to be fed, and the nations to be reached with the Gospel, our money is not where our mouth is.  Now I could spend a lot of time debating on the legitimacy of pastors’ salaries and church building budgets, but the truth is that buildings and salaries only consume about 60% percent of most churches’ budgets.  My question is where does the other 37% go?

My point in bringing all of this up is this: our giving tends to go right back to ourselves.  We give and feel good about being sacrificial, but in reality we are consuming so much of what we give that no radical change takes place.  Those who are strategically placed to significantly impact the world and extend the Kingdom of God often struggle with financing very real needs in spite of our overwhelming “generosity.”  This is why no matter how much money we give, we fail to see significant Jesus movements take shape.

This is nothing new.  Whenever the church has found herself disconnected from her apostolic purpose, she has used her resources poorly, most often for herself.  But God has a financial system that is designed to meet legitimate needs and fuel the Kingdom of God.  Our part in the process is to stop using our resources poorly, get connected with the purposes of God, and begin to channel money towards people and ministries who are actively pursuing those things that are on God’s agenda.

What if we put our money into the hands of people where God is powerfully manifesting His Kingdom right now?  What would happen if we actually supported men and women who were raising up multiplying disciple-making movements in the earth? What would happen if we actually fully funded apostolic teams planting churches and reaching unreached people groups?  What if those who were frequently engaged in caring for the poor or healing the sick through the workings of miracles never had to spend time writing another support letter?  Would that be better than the new carpet?

Photo Credit: Empty Pockets by Danielmoyle

*Editor’s Note: Africa (especially) and America in general both have significant needs. By striking them from the record my goal is to show that need is nearby, not that one form of need is greater than another.