Tag Archive | Jesus Movements

Financing A Kingdom Revolution

For those who missed it, Andrew Jones of TallSkinnyKiwi fame wrote about the unseen financiers who supported the Protestant Reformation.  Jones writes about different important “Kingdom Investors” who at various points gave significant amounts of money and resources to aid the spread of the Reformation. Reading the post, I was struck again by the need for a financial revolution that undergirds every genuine move of God.

Wolfgang Simson will be the first person to tell you that much of what you’ve heard about money in church is wrong. We often teach about money in a way that causes us to put all of our hopes in non-Kingdom financial principles.  However one thing that remains true is that all Empires (including the Kingdom of God, which is the empire we belong to) have a financial system in place to fund their activities.  Not all money given to a church is used well, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t use our finances to further this Kingdom revolution.

The truth is that all of us have a part to play in financing the advancement of the Kingdom.  I remember reading Brother Yun’s book Living Waters where he described offerings that the Chinese house churches would take for members being sent off as missionaries.  Some of the members of the house churches were so broken because they didn’t have money to contribute that as they wept, they would place themselves in the offering sack as pledge to devote their whole selves to the cause global evangelism.

This is the kind of giving that moves forward the Kingdom: Financial giving that flows from a life fully given over to Jesus.  That’s what makes the testimony of the early church so powerful.  They were continually giving everything extra they had to the cause of Jesus and His Kingdom.  This enabled the poor to be taken care of and the Gospel to continue to spread through the apostles and others.  Today the Kingdom of God continues to spread, but it does so with little access to the funds that could so enable to spread quickly and without the financial sacrifice that is characteristic of an apostolic movement.

So how do we finance a Kingdom revolution? It begins with giving our very selves to God and letting our finances reflect that level of sacrifice.  In our next post we’ll look at where those finances need to flow to.  But today, let me ask you this question: What do you think holds us back from joining God in financing the advancement of the Kingdom?

Photo Credit: International Money Pile in Cash and Coins by epSos.de

The Wayback Machine: December

Some things just get better with age.  “The Wayback Machine” posts occur at the end of every month and reference the best posts of that month in years past.  My hope is to provide a good jumping on point for readers who have never been to Pursuing Glory.

2009

Primal by Mark Batterson

I received an early copy of Primal, a book by National Community Church pastor Mark Batterson.  This was a good read that took a look at loving God with all of our heart, soul, mind, and strength.

2008

Acts 29 and Movement Thinking

Jesus raises up movements that sweep large numbers of souls into the Kingdom of God.  In this post, I look at the nature of movements as unpacked by Mark Driscoll during an Acts 29 gathering.  It’s good food for thought if you’ve never though of Christianity as a movement.

Notes from the Margins

So I bought this new bible (Wide Margin ESV) and it inspired me to start a new feature where bloggers (in particular, me) talk about what we’re learning as we’re reading through the Bible.  I’ve done a few more like it, and I would love to see others join me.  If you’re interested, let me know.

Christmas Greetings, Dr. Seuss Style

I always love wishing someone a “Merry Christmas.” You really can’t do much better on a Christmas post than to challenge materialism, talk about the incarnation of Christ, and quote Dr. Seuss.  This post may set the standard for my Christmas greetings in the future.

2006

A New Addition to the Family

I was just a new blogger in 2006, but I also became a new dad!  This was the only blog of December 2006, but it announces the birth of my first child.  She’s just as special four years later as she was when I posted this.

Photo Credit: Dr Who by Aussiegal

Simple Church Networks in Europe (And What it Means for the United States)

Simple Church Europe just released its findings of its latest survey.  The survey is an attempt by the leaders of the organization to uncover meaningful trends in the house church movement in Europe.  You can get the full survey by following by jumping to their website here.

I won’t quote much of the 21 page report because, though it won’t cost you any money, Simple Church Europe does want you to download the report straight from their site.  It’s important to look at their conclusions because the United States is quickly becoming a post-Christian nation, much like Europe.  Their findings will greatly help us in the future.

The report actually breaks down three types of house church networks that exist in Europe:

  • (a) Apostolic networks: simple church groups started by an apostolic worker ‘straight in the harvest’, mostly along the lines of the instructions Jesus gave his disciples in Luke 10 (planting a new simple church group in a household/social circle instead of inviting people to an existing church meeting). These networks are primarily made up of new believers who just heard about Jesus, are being discipled, and win others to plant new groups.
  • (b) Bridge networks: simple church groups made up of existing Christians who intentionally seek to be ‘missional’. They try to build relationships with non-believers, often using conventional forms of evangelism and a ‘come to us’ approach.
  • (c) Christian networks: simple church groups formed by existing Christians who mainly seek a more relational and participatory alternative for conventional church. These groups tend to be inward-focused and sometimes reactionary: seeing their way of church as more biblical and healthy than the churches they come from.”

Not surprisingly, apostolic networks grew at a faster rate than Bridge networks and Christian Networks (which as best as I can determine are more like small groups that have a larger meeting once a week).  Apostolic networks see house church groups dissolve at a slightly higher rate as well.  The most encouraging finding, however, is that apostolic networks see the highest number of conversions among people from previously non-Christian backgrounds.

What this points to is that fact that Luke 10-style church planting (Person of Peace, building on relationships around that person of peace, etc.) is both risky and incredibly rewarding for the Kingdom.  Not surprisingly, the authors of the study suggest that bridge networks and Christian networks learn from the apostolic networks in a way that causes Kingdom expansion.

What does that mean for us?   No research of this kind has been done in the United States, but these stories seem familiar from what I’ve seen in the house church movement in the United states.  All three types of networks exist here and are growing.  The major difference between our context and Europe is Europe’s population is much more secular than ours.

I think one of the major points this report emphasizes is the need to learn from apostolic workers who are building house church networks accoridng to the Luke 10 principle.  Everywhere I see significant Kingdom expansion happening in the house church movement, this seems to be the model.

I think this report also highlights the tendency of churches that are not started out of the harvest to draw on already existing relationships with believers or those with a Christian background to fill our churches.  We definitely want a place for everyone to belong and be equipped. But if our concern is for the harvest then those starting house churches among primarily Christians (myself included) need to adjust our models and strategies for church planting in the future.  We want to avoid doing ministry that only attracts Christians and focus on those activities that are bringing lost individuals to Jesus.

This also highlights a great need however in the house church-community-at-large.  That need is for those with apostolic and evangelistic giftings to seriously consider training and equipping others.  Without more apostolic and evangelistic giftings functioning in and training our house churches, we will continue to draw people but we may not impact the Kingdom significantly.  This will also require a significant amount of humility on the part of existing house churches, because until now many house churches have been reluctant to accept this kind of help.

I would love to know what you think. Does this survey reflect your experience with house churches in the United States?  If you are participating in a non-apostolic house church network, are there changes that need to be made to grow in apostolic methods?  What are the hindrances to that?  Jump to the survey here, read it, and come back and let me know your thoughts.

If you’re looking for more information on the house church movement in the United States you can check out my previous post on house church stats  here or pick up the book Missional House Churches, by J.D. Payne (Amazon Affiliate Link).

Photo Credit: Floating Networks by WebWizzard