Tag Archive | Bible Reading

On Discipleship: Divine Truth

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Making disciples who make disciples is part of the commission Jesus gave us as believers (Matthew 28:18-20, 2 Timothy 2:2). Jesus Himself told us to teach them to obey everything He commanded, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise to us that a large part of making disciples involves all of us getting into the Bible and studying it together.

As I mentioned yesterday, our corporate discipline involves 2 or 3 people gathering together and reading large amounts of Scripture, somewhere between 20 & 30 chapters a week. Why are we so determined to study the Bible? Jesus said that His very words are Spirit and life (John 6:63). The message of the Kingdom contained within the Bible is like a seed in our hearts (Mark 4:13-14, 26-27). The more we can get that message of the Kingdom into our hearts and spirits, the more of the Kingdom we see take root in our life.

So, every time our groups of 2&3 gather, we pick a section of Scripture, usually 20 or 30 chapters in a row. This section is what everyone is reading this week. This week my 2&3 is reading the book of Mark, last week was the book of Revelation. Sometimes it’s multiple books like 1st and 2nd Corinthians.  The point isn’t to finish the section every single week. Many weeks someone in my 2&3 doesn’t finish. When this happens, we start over, and read it again the following week. When everyone finishes the 20 or 30 chapters in the same week, that’s when it’s time to pick a new section of Scripture.

Why do we read the Bible together like this? The main reason is it’s good to be in the Bible hearing Jesus for ourselves. As Christians we believe the Bible is the only inspired message from God and because of that, it is fuel for us to grow up into the likeness of Jesus. But in addition to that, reading large portions of the Bible together keeps us from heresy. Mutual discipleship means there’s no authorized leader of a 2&3. If we read significant portions of the Bible together in context, each believer is able to say “Can you show me where you found that in the reading?” whenever a controversial statement is expressed. One final thought about reading together like this: It eats away at our carnal independence. Many people are content to read what they want, when they want. This process asks us to be formed as disciples together.

We want to be careful of a few things. The intent of this time is not turn our 2&3’s into a Bible study. Bible studies are good and have their place. But our goal instead is to figure out how Jesus encountered us in the Scriptures and is asking us to obey Him.  This isn’t the chance for those gifted as teachers to break down whole chapters of the Bible for everyone else.

Also, we need to be careful of dead religion. Jesus rebuked the Pharisees for reading the Bible but resisting the very One that the Scriptures pointed to (John 5:39). The goal is not to become an expert, the goal is meet the One who Scripture points to! But reading and immersing ourselves in truths within the Bible is the surest way to do that.

I think in the West, because the Bible is so available to us, it can become easy to grow cold to its ability to transform us. The words sound familiar and if we fail to take the words back to the Holy Spirit and ask Him to encounter us around those words, our hearts can grow dull to the Word. I believe the word of God has the power to change human hearts. Have you ever seen Chinese believers receive a Bible for the first time? It should humble us. We need to hunger for God’s word like these fiery believers who are being transformed by the Gospel.

What I’ve described here is a corporate discipline that we embrace to make disciples. But friends, the heart here is that we are soft towards God’s word and being transformed by it. We need not only to read it ourselves, but join with others and help each other find the divine truth God has hidden in its pages.

 

 

 

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How To Feed Yourself (Spiritually Speaking)

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Yesterday I shared some thoughts about how “not being fed spiritually” isn’t why we participate in a church. My primary argument (in case you hate clicking links) is that we weren’t primarily designed be fed by another person, but by the Lord Himself.  But I realize that because of the state of the church today, that could leave many of you asking, “How do I do that?”

Because of that, I want to look at four different ways the Bible encourages us to fuel our spiritual man.  God actually has ways for you to feed your heart and soul yourself as you encounter Him. My encouragement to you is to look at the four different ways listed below and pick one (or more) that you aren’t doing, but to also do it daily for ninety days before you give up on it. There are many, many days where the disciplines I practice don’t feel like they are accomplishing anything. But the overall effect of doing them consistently over the years has had a tremendous impact on my life.

So, to feed your spiritual man, you should try the following:

  1. Pray. I know what you’re thinking. You pray. But I’m not talking about the short “Help me, God,” sort of prayers we pray throughout hectic days. I’m talking about a kind of prayer where your mind is focused, your heart is attentive, and you and the Father are dialoguing back and forth. Part of the problem we experience with prayer is much of the church has taught us not to expect God to talk back to us.   But prayer is a communion of our spirit with God’s Holy Spirit where real relationship happens. If you have problems praying I have a few suggestions: 1) Get alone. 2) Leave behind all of your electronic devices. 3) Bring a pen and some paper. Write your part of the conversation out on paper and then wait. And as God brings truth to your spirit or brings up a Bible verse, or shows you a picture write those things down. Over time as you practice this, you’ll begin to get good at hearing the voice of the Holy Spirit as you wait for Him.
  2. Read the Bible. Again, this can seem so elementary, but we so don’t do the simple things and it hurts us. Can we put away our books, our blogs (even this one?), our Christian programs, and truly begin to understand what God is saying? Jesus (and Moses) said “People do not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God,” (Matthew 4:4). We have to get to our place in our walk where we understand we are dependent on God’s word to feed our spirit on a daily basis. This encounter with the word has to go beyond just dull, repetitive reading, though, to ushering us into an encounter with Jesus (John 5:39). In our network, I encourage believers to get in groups of two or three and read 20 to 30 chapters of the Bible in context every week.  Consuming a large amount of Scripture in context has helped us grow in understanding of God’s will for our lives.  Not only that, but we’ve met God in the process.
  3. Do the will of the Father. I have a kind of food you know nothing about…My nourishment comes from doing the will of God, who sent me, and from finishing his work,” (John 4:32-34). Jesus, as a human being, had learned to become dependent, not on natural food, but a spiritual food that came from the Father.  This wasn’t just because Jesus was God. Jesus had to lay aside His divine nature and become like us in all things (Philippians 2:6-8). So His entire life was an example of how redeemed humanity can live in relationship to the Father. Friends, this means you can be fed spiritually when you participate in God’s will! That can be as simple as encouraging someone or responding to a truth from the Bible or as unique as Jesus prophesying to the Samaritan woman about her various scandals and leading her to repentance.  Regardless, every time we do God’s will, it strengthens who we are on the inside. Many of my friends who understand spiritual disciplines miss this reality because it can’t be done alone in a closet. But some of my most spiritually dynamic mentors and friends are people who were people who received from God and obeyed when He asked them to act.  Don’t miss this powerful step!
  4. Pray in the Spirit. Paul had a very particular type of prayer that he stressed was important for building up our inner man. This was praying in tongues or praying in the Spirit and it was designed as form of communion between our spirit and God’s Spirit.  When Paul talks about this type of prayer, he says that a believer “…will be speaking by the power of the Spirit…[and] is strengthened personally,” (1 Corinthians 14:2-4). And because of this, Paul says about himself “I thank God that I speak in tongues more than any of you,” (1 Corinthians 14:18). I think many times, we under-emphasize the role this gift has in strengthening our spiritual lives. Much could be written about this gift, but let’s start here: If you have this ability, put it into practice daily. If you don’t have this gift, ask the Lord for it.  He loves to give more of the Spirit to those who ask.  

Daily…

The Old Testament has a story that we can learn from in regard to these disciplines. During their time in the wilderness, God would rain down manna from heaven  for the Israelites to eat and told them to gather what they needed for that day. If they tried to gather more than what they needed for that day, when they went to eat it the next day, what was left over had rotted and was covered in maggots. They couldn’t live off the previous day’s manna.

So too, we can’t live off of one good day with the Lord or three good days in a week, let alone one day a week when we gather as a church. Again, much of the church is weaker than it needs to be because they aren’t daily engaging the Lord in these ways.

My encouragement to you if you read yesterday’s post and didn’t know where to start is to pick one of these disciplines that you aren’t strong in and practice it for the next seven days. Take stock on what you’ve noticed as far as a change in your walk. I want you to spend 90 days trying a discipline, but even at one solid week, my guess is you will start to see a dynamic change in your walk with the Lord.

Remember, this is important. You were created for relationship with God. Don’t miss these avenues to encountering Him and growing by feeding yourself on God and His word.

The Wayback Machine: December

Some things just get better with age.  “The Wayback Machine” posts occur at the end of every month and reference the best posts of that month in years past.  My hope is to provide a good jumping on point for readers who have never been to Pursuing Glory.

2009

Primal by Mark Batterson

I received an early copy of Primal, a book by National Community Church pastor Mark Batterson.  This was a good read that took a look at loving God with all of our heart, soul, mind, and strength.

2008

Acts 29 and Movement Thinking

Jesus raises up movements that sweep large numbers of souls into the Kingdom of God.  In this post, I look at the nature of movements as unpacked by Mark Driscoll during an Acts 29 gathering.  It’s good food for thought if you’ve never though of Christianity as a movement.

Notes from the Margins

So I bought this new bible (Wide Margin ESV) and it inspired me to start a new feature where bloggers (in particular, me) talk about what we’re learning as we’re reading through the Bible.  I’ve done a few more like it, and I would love to see others join me.  If you’re interested, let me know.

Christmas Greetings, Dr. Seuss Style

I always love wishing someone a “Merry Christmas.” You really can’t do much better on a Christmas post than to challenge materialism, talk about the incarnation of Christ, and quote Dr. Seuss.  This post may set the standard for my Christmas greetings in the future.

2006

A New Addition to the Family

I was just a new blogger in 2006, but I also became a new dad!  This was the only blog of December 2006, but it announces the birth of my first child.  She’s just as special four years later as she was when I posted this.

Photo Credit: Dr Who by Aussiegal

Widows and the Church

This blog is part of my continuing series “Notes From The Margins.”  This series has a set of guidelines that you can read about here.

“Honor widows who are truly widows. But if a widow has children or grandchildren, let them first learn to show godliness to their own household and to make some return to their parents, for this is pleasing in the sight of God. She who is truly a widow, left all alone, has set her hope on God and continues in supplications and prayers night and day, but she who is self-indulgent is dead even while she lives. Command these things as well, so that they may be without reproach. But if anyone does not provide for his relatives, and especially for members of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.

Let a widow be enrolled if she is not less than sixty years of age, having been the wife of one husband,and having a reputation for good works: if she has brought up children, has shown hospitality, has washed the feet of the saints, has cared for the afflicted, and has devoted herself to every good work. But refuse to enroll younger widows, for when their passions draw them away from Christ, they desire to marry and so incur condemnation for having abandoned their former faith. Besides that, they learn to be idlers, going about from house to house, and not only idlers, but also gossips and busybodies, saying what they should not. So I would have younger widows marry, bear children, manage their households, and give the adversary no occasion for slander. For some have already strayed after Satan. If any believing woman has relatives who are widows, let her care for them. Let the church not be burdened, so that it may care for those who are truly widows,”  (1 Timothy 5:3-15).

Paul in this passage is addressing a situation in the church at Ephesus.  Timothy was left to set the church there in order and part of that process in Paul’s mind was straightening out the church’s support of widows.  Now I’ve read these verses twenty times or so in the last few months and I’ve come to appreciate the wisdom Paul gives Timothy to lead those at Ephesus.  But here’s what struck me the other day: the Church of the New Testament took caring for widows as a serious responsibility.

That sound’s like a “duh” statement, but think about it for a minute.  Paul gives these instructions “so that [the church] may care for those who are truly widows.”  At the heart of Paul’s instructions is this burning desire to make sure the church can care for those who are really widows.  Paul didn’t write these words to show us who wasn’t worthy of care and he didn’t write this in response to an isolated first-century situation (cf. Acts 6:1, James 1:27).

But we have missed the forest for the trees.  We talk about who should be on the list but we don’t support any widows.  We don’t take care of women who cannot take care of themselves.  We affirm the truth of what Paul writes but regularly ignore what Paul was actually doing.  All of this is to say that the church needs to be about the things that are on the heart of the Lord.  For Paul, this wasn’t just a mercy ministry, it was essential to the Gospel.  He wrote these instructions so that we could care for widows well and teach those in our midst how to care for their family.   This is part of the church being “a pillar and support of the the truth,” (1 Timothy 3:15). This is something we need to return to.

So…how are you caring for widows?  Have you seen a church do this well in the past?  In an age of social security and looking to the government to care for us, is this even possible?  How would the way churches spend money have to change if this became a reality? Also, please remember Guideline #5.


Notes From the Margins

From time to time, I like to start new features here in the blog.  You can check out my last new feature that I started, called “Blogs I Wish I Wrotehere.  Now, to be honest, I’ve only posted a “Blog I Wish I Wrote” one time….but I haven’t seen any blogs I’ve been jealous over lately…so I’m kind of limited here, okay?

esv-2Let me give you a little background on this new feature.  See, awhile ago I bought this great new ESV bible with giant, lined margins for note-takers like myself.  I’ve always wanted a bible that took the space most Bibles give to commentary and leaves it empty for you to write your own commentary.  The cynical side of me believes the market for a Bible like this has to be incredibly small.  Regardless, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the Bible and am quickly filling up the pages.

esv1Anyways, it’s time for another new feature called “Notes From the Margins.”   My hope is to post here somewhat regularly something that I’ve discovered in my Bible reading and scrawled across the note-taking sides of my new Bible.  Now, like any good feature there are a few rules and guidelines.  I will list them here and refer back to them when I post:

  1. I will quote the passage of the scripture I am commenting on first before I give any thoughts on the passage in question.  I do not do this for my benefit, but for yours.  Please take the time to read the passage before you read my thoughts.  I will not respond to anyone who has obviously not read the quote and just wants to argue based on opinions.
  2. These are the notes in my Bible, nothing more, nothing less.  Please test them against the Scripture quoted in the post.  See Rule #1.
  3. These are the notes in my Bible, not yours.  You should feel free to contradict what I say in my post in the comment section if you want, but at the end of the day, I may not erase my notes from my Bible or from this blog if I still disagree with you.
  4. Notes are notes.  What I mean by that is these are things that I scribble down as I am in the moment.  They are ideas that are not static or the mature fruit of study.  Often they will be ideas in seed form that the Lord will develop as we go.  Please allow me (and others) to change our minds on these verses as the Lord gives more light. See Note # 2.
  5. Participation is great.  I could keep these thoughts in the margins of my Bible, but no one would benefit from them.  Please comment on my thoughts, leave your own, and even feel free to post your own “Notes from the Margins” in the comment section or on your own blog.  If you decide to post your own notes on your own blog, let me know so I can link you in.

Okay, so those are the rules, kids.  Have fun.  Look for a “Notes from the Margins” post in your neighborhood soon!