Embracing the Danger of the Gospel

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It’s easy to talk about living dangerously. I find there’s a lot of talk about laying our lives down for the sake of Christ, but most of us hear those verses and think they’re only for missionaries to scary countries. Or worse, we spiritualize them mean just laying down our ambitions or something important to us, nothing more. It’s hard, in our middle class, Western mind to fathom God really asking us to risk anything significant.

But Jesus calls us to lay down our very lives for the Gospel. That may mean our physical lives. Every time I travel to Africa to serve the church there, I have to count that cost. I have to lay down at the feet of Jesus my fears for my wife, my young family, and whatever else I’m responsible for every single time I go. You don’t want to see me right after that time I have with the Lord. I’m a mess. It’s not just in regards to Africa, though. I have to do the same thing on a regular basis here in the sphere of influence the Lord has given me.

For the last several years I’ve been focusing most of my time and attention in the inner city neighborhood I live in. I’ve also been pretty direct about working with people that don’t darken the doors of a church building. To be clear, there are plenty of hard-working, decent people where I live. However, there is also a fair number of people with lives that are a mess. The homeless, the drug-addict, the sex-addict, the attention-addict. The list goes on. These are the people Jesus would hang out with. But they are also not the safest people in the world to minister to.

And for the last several years, I’ve also been fairly forward about calling people to live their lives down here with us. Coming into the neighborhood, dropping the Gospel, and then leaving wasn’t going to work. Come, be a part of the neighborhood. Learn how to interact with people who have no interest in your church. Come share the Gospel here. Come make disciples here. Come live here. Give your lives.

This came home clearly a few years ago. My wife and a friend were regularly meeting at our local McDonald‘s as part of their weekly discipleship time. I received a call late one night from my wife. She was a little bit frantic. As her and her friend were leaving, someone they had never met before walked up to them in the parking lot and punched her friend and ran off. There was no rhyme or reason to it.  Now this would have been horrible in any circumstance, but our friend was nine months pregnant at the time.

I’m happy to report that other than some bruising, everyone came out okay. Our friend gave birth to a healthy, active baby boy. The police never caught the assailant.  But we experienced a wake up call that day.  There is a cost to living on mission that you rarely hear about. There is a danger that we all have to embrace.  This could have turned out much worse.

Jesus did not call us to be safe. Countless believers have lost their lives over the course of church history as they’ve tried to bring the Gospel to people who didn’t have it. In other places in the world, becoming a follower of Jesus is a death sentence. It’s only in the West we are fairly inexperienced at loosing anything for our faith.

It’s important to be very clear: Jesus does not call us to safety.  He calls us to love Him and trust Him. He also calls us to trust Him with the risk that doesn’t make sense in light of His Sovereignty. And He calls us, regardless of whether we go to Africa or live in the inner city or practice mission to the most broken or live in the gated communities of the upper class to lay down our lives for His sake and the Gospel’s sake.

For too long, Christians have talked about laying their lives down and been willing to do it in abstract ways. It’s time for us to embrace the fact that Jesus calls us to truly put our lives on the line. We need to ask the hard questions: Is God still good if my worst fear happens? Is the Gospel worth really loosing my life? If we are willing to count the reward, the answer is “Yes.”

If we embrace the danger of living for the gospel, we will find, on the other side, true life.

If you try to hang on to your life, you will lose it. But if you give up your life for my sake and for the sake of the Good News, you will save it.

-Jesus, Mark 8:35

Photo Credit: Danger by Doran

 

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About traviskolder

Travis Kolder is a follower of Jesus, a husband, a father of five, an organic church planter, and a writer. He lives in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he serves as part of the Cedar Rapids House Church Network.

3 responses to “Embracing the Danger of the Gospel”

  1. melissadugan says :

    Wow that’s real. So many will never come through the doors of a church building but they need THE CHURCH’S love. So just keep loving them Travis!

    Happy Connecting. Sent from my Sprint Phone.

  2. gunnarlarmstrong says :

    Travis: Thanks for writing this. Thanks for following the King where he leads you. I agree with you that we take our lives to the lost, not just occasionally give them a couple hours of our time. I honor you for following the Lord where he has led you . My situation is not nearly as dangerous, but, hopefully, I am here following the Lord and not just living where I want to live (I know that going to the inner city is not a place I would naturally choose). However, I am pretty convinced that I am where the Lord wants me to be, and that I am using my time, and responding to the opportunities that he gives me, the way that he wants me to be doing. But, it is challenging to hear about someone following the Lord into a much more dangerous place. Gunnar

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  1. Danger and the Church | Pursuing Glory - March 26, 2017

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