The Cost of Disobedience (Thirty Days to Greater Fruitfulness, Day 2)

This blog has been temporarily overtaken by my Thirty Days To Greater Fruitfulness Challenge.  You can find out more by checking out the Introduction.

Today was a day not unlike yesterday.  It was filled with a lot of distracted silence and little changes.  I want to highlight one quick event that I think is relevant to this “Thirty Days” experiment.

Today when I was driving home from work, it was pouring down rain.  My thoughts as I made my way home were on the relative lack of difference I had noticed between today and any of the days before this challenge began.  So, I did what humans do and began to complain to the Lord about the situation.

It was at this point that I noticed a guy walking in the rain with nothing to shield himself.  As I drove past him I felt my heart go out to this guy who had to walk in the rain.  In a way I haven’t felt in a little while, I began to think maybe I should slow down and offer the guy a ride.  I quickly wrote off the idea as something not from the Lord and went back to my complaining, but as I did I realized that quite possibly the sense of compassion I felt in my heart might just be the Lord speaking to me.  So I turned around.

I would like to end this story by saying that I picked up the guy and he came to know Jesus.  I would even enjoy saying I picked up this guy and feel like I really did what the Lord said.  In reality, by the time I turned around and went back to where he was, I couldn’t find him.

So here’s the lesson from today: I could have obeyed quicker and at least seen if there might have been fruit. But because I didn’t I have no way of knowing whether the Lord was the One pulling the strings of my heart or not.  I suspect He was.  But the only way I will ever know is if I trust those tiny, faint, gut level leadings that I’ve not always been convinced are the Lord.  Should I feel bad about today? Probably not.  Jesus still loves me and He will speak to me again.  But should I learn from today and trust Him while He’s leading me tomorrow? Absolutely.

So, if you heard His voice but weren’t sure today, there’s grace for you.  But as we walk this road, let’s see if we can respond faster and respond rightly and see what the results actually are.

What are you learning?

Join us on the “Thirty Days to Greater Fruitfulness” experiment.  For the rest of September we are spending 30 minutes in silent prayer listening to Jesus and then acting on what He asks us to do.  Then we blog about the changes that are occurring in our lives through the marriage of listening and obedience.  It’s not too late.  If you’re just checking out that experiment feel free to jump in.  And if you want more information, you can check it out here.

Photo Credit: Calendar by Adreanna Moyer Photography

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About traviskolder

Travis Kolder is a follower of Jesus, a husband, a father of five, an organic church planter, and a writer. He lives in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he serves as part of the Cedar Rapids House Church Network.

2 responses to “The Cost of Disobedience (Thirty Days to Greater Fruitfulness, Day 2)”

  1. Bryan Hamilton says :

    I am finding that to be faithful in anything like this it requires a thousand small steps in the right direction. The few successes on the mountain of missed opportunities is what true obedience looks like. Lord I ask for opportunities for Travis to show God’s compassion to people during his day. Lord give him greater fruit.

Trackbacks / Pingbacks

  1. Thirty Days To Greater Fruitfulness: Week One « Pursuing Glory - September 8, 2010

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