Tag Archive | House Church Movements

Food For Thought: Getting Back In The Swing Edition

Every week here at Pursuing Glory I try to bring together the best posts I’ve found that will equip the end-times church to operate in her God-ordained destiny.  These are the best blogs, articles, books and other resources related to our purpose here at this site.  Feel free to visit, comment, and make use of the resources found at each site.

This week marks the return of me to blogging after letting that part of my life slide for a few weeks.  I’ve had a chance to hang out with some of the coolest people who aren’t part of our house church recently.  However that time spent has taken me away from writing, so I’m going to try and get back in the swing of things.  This post represents the best posts from the last few weeks. Enjoy!

Community Elements: Jesus

I think that Jesus is most frequently the part of community that we leave out when we begin to discect a Christian community.  Alan writes about Jesus’ centrality in a way that makes his whole discussions on the elements of a church more palatable than most similar discussions.

Two Vital Needs of Every Disciple

One of the things that gets left out of most discussions about discipleship is the necessity of being able to make other disciples.  Here Ray writes about the paradox of following Jesus and leading others into following Him.

Change the Atmosphere, Change the Culture

One of the shifts that I’ve seen help people move from a static church mindset into a movement mindset is discovering the spirit of multiplication that the apostles walked in.  Here J.D. talks about how that happens with a  group people who currently have no vision for reproducing churches.

Misunderstanding Persecution

One of the common misconceptions in the body of Christ is that house churches in the third world are effective because persecution happening around them fuels evangelism and discipleship.  Actually persecution causes the church to return to her organic roots and when she does that, she spreads quickly and naturally.

A Grove of Aspen Trees

With the house church movement in the United States as new as it is, little has been written about what mature house church networks look like.  This post has an incredible visual that says volumes about how a network of house churches can function interdependently.

Photo Credit: Design Probes – Food for Thought by centralasian.

Simple Church Networks in Europe (And What it Means for the United States)

Simple Church Europe just released its findings of its latest survey.  The survey is an attempt by the leaders of the organization to uncover meaningful trends in the house church movement in Europe.  You can get the full survey by following by jumping to their website here.

I won’t quote much of the 21 page report because, though it won’t cost you any money, Simple Church Europe does want you to download the report straight from their site.  It’s important to look at their conclusions because the United States is quickly becoming a post-Christian nation, much like Europe.  Their findings will greatly help us in the future.

The report actually breaks down three types of house church networks that exist in Europe:

  • (a) Apostolic networks: simple church groups started by an apostolic worker ‘straight in the harvest’, mostly along the lines of the instructions Jesus gave his disciples in Luke 10 (planting a new simple church group in a household/social circle instead of inviting people to an existing church meeting). These networks are primarily made up of new believers who just heard about Jesus, are being discipled, and win others to plant new groups.
  • (b) Bridge networks: simple church groups made up of existing Christians who intentionally seek to be ‘missional’. They try to build relationships with non-believers, often using conventional forms of evangelism and a ‘come to us’ approach.
  • (c) Christian networks: simple church groups formed by existing Christians who mainly seek a more relational and participatory alternative for conventional church. These groups tend to be inward-focused and sometimes reactionary: seeing their way of church as more biblical and healthy than the churches they come from.”

Not surprisingly, apostolic networks grew at a faster rate than Bridge networks and Christian Networks (which as best as I can determine are more like small groups that have a larger meeting once a week).  Apostolic networks see house church groups dissolve at a slightly higher rate as well.  The most encouraging finding, however, is that apostolic networks see the highest number of conversions among people from previously non-Christian backgrounds.

What this points to is that fact that Luke 10-style church planting (Person of Peace, building on relationships around that person of peace, etc.) is both risky and incredibly rewarding for the Kingdom.  Not surprisingly, the authors of the study suggest that bridge networks and Christian networks learn from the apostolic networks in a way that causes Kingdom expansion.

What does that mean for us?   No research of this kind has been done in the United States, but these stories seem familiar from what I’ve seen in the house church movement in the United states.  All three types of networks exist here and are growing.  The major difference between our context and Europe is Europe’s population is much more secular than ours.

I think one of the major points this report emphasizes is the need to learn from apostolic workers who are building house church networks accoridng to the Luke 10 principle.  Everywhere I see significant Kingdom expansion happening in the house church movement, this seems to be the model.

I think this report also highlights the tendency of churches that are not started out of the harvest to draw on already existing relationships with believers or those with a Christian background to fill our churches.  We definitely want a place for everyone to belong and be equipped. But if our concern is for the harvest then those starting house churches among primarily Christians (myself included) need to adjust our models and strategies for church planting in the future.  We want to avoid doing ministry that only attracts Christians and focus on those activities that are bringing lost individuals to Jesus.

This also highlights a great need however in the house church-community-at-large.  That need is for those with apostolic and evangelistic giftings to seriously consider training and equipping others.  Without more apostolic and evangelistic giftings functioning in and training our house churches, we will continue to draw people but we may not impact the Kingdom significantly.  This will also require a significant amount of humility on the part of existing house churches, because until now many house churches have been reluctant to accept this kind of help.

I would love to know what you think. Does this survey reflect your experience with house churches in the United States?  If you are participating in a non-apostolic house church network, are there changes that need to be made to grow in apostolic methods?  What are the hindrances to that?  Jump to the survey here, read it, and come back and let me know your thoughts.

If you’re looking for more information on the house church movement in the United States you can check out my previous post on house church stats  here or pick up the book Missional House Churches, by J.D. Payne (Amazon Affiliate Link).

Photo Credit: Floating Networks by WebWizzard

Leaders For The Harvest

Tonight I was on the phone with one of my good friends from Kansas City that I haven’t had a chance to chat with in a while.  I was describing some of the wins we are experiencing and some of the challenges that are occurring at the same time.  After two or three minutes, my friend gently broke into the conversation and challenged me.  “You know what you should be spending your time doing right now is developing leaders for your third and fourth house church right now, right?”

I was dumbfounded (for a couple of reasons).  I was shocked by how quickly he saw straight into the heart of some of the problems I’ve been facing.  But more than that, I was shocked at how obvious what he was saying was and how clearly I had missed that fact.  It seems that in preparing a church for the harvest, I had totally neglected leadership development in our midst.

But the conversation gets right to the heart of a problem that I believe we face in the West.  Our ability to reach further into the harvest depends significantly on our ability to raise up new, harvest-minded leaders in our midst.  We think finding the harvest is our biggest issue. We often forget that the harvest is plentiful but the workers are few.

Join me today in praying that God would raise up workers for His harvest here and where you are.

Photo Credit: Bosworth Battlefield (2) by Jams_123